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National Kidney Month at Midwest Nephrology

National Kidney Month at Midwest Nephrology

Kidney health is a high priority at Midwest Nephrology and we want you to make your health a priority. March is National Kidney Month, a time when communities across the country bring awareness about kidney disease.


Developing a healthy lifestyle can help you manage and slow progression of CKD and its complications.Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a serious condition affecting 37 million people. Often overlooked until symptoms appear, CKD is progressive and can put you at risk for serious health complications including kidney failure.

Follow these healthy lifestyle tips to take charge of your kidney health.

  • Monitor your overall health. Meet regularly with your health care team. Staying connected with your doctor, whether in-person or using telehealth via phone or computer, can help you maintain your kidney health.
  • Take medicine as prescribed and avoid NSAIDs like ibuprofen and naproxen. Your pharmacist and doctor need to know about all the medicines you take.
  • Manage blood pressure and monitor blood glucose levels. Work with your health care team to develop a plan to meet your blood pressure goals and check your blood glucose level regularly if you have diabetes.
  • Develop a healthy weight goal. Create a healthy meal plan and consider working with your doctor to develop a weight-loss plan that works for you.
  • Reduce stress and make physical activity part of your routine. Consider healthy stress-reducing activities and get at least 30 minutes or more of physical activity each day.
  • Make sleep a priority. Aim for 7 to 8 hours of sleep per night.
  • Stop smoking. If you smoke, take steps to quit.

It may seem difficult, but small changes can go a long way to keeping your kidneys and you healthier for longer. Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are ready to assist you with a plan to take charge of your health. Contact Midwest Nephrology today to get started.

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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Kidney Treatment Team

Kidney Treatment Team

Get to know your kidney treatment team, learn the important role your dialysis nurse will play in your dialysis treatment. So what is a dialysis nurse? A dialysis nurse is also known as a nephrology nurse, which in layman's terms the word nephrology means “relating to the kidneys.” Nephrology nurses are nurses specially trained and educated to care for patients with kidney disease. These specialty nurses are responsible for supervising your individual dialysis treatments and a host of other responsibilities to ensure maximum comfort and confidence. Beyond just being caregivers, these nurses are also advocater, educators, facilitators, and mentors to you throughout your dialysis treatment journey.

Dialysis Nurse Responsibilities include:

  • Checking and recording your vitals throughout your dialysis treatment.
  • Ensuring your dialysis treatments are administered correctly.
  • Teaching you and your family members how to operate home dialysis machines for home dialysis therapy.
  • Educating you and your loved ones on your dialysis treatment options, kidney disease management, diet and exercise regimens.

Overall your Nephrology nurses are there to make your dialysis treatments as seamless and comfortable as possible. Giving you peace of mind and confidence every time you go through dialysis. If you have any more questions or concerns about your up-and-coming dialysis treatment, contact Midwest Nephrology today. We know dialysis can be confusing and we’re here to help. We have been serving the greater Southeastern Wisconsin area since 1989 and have a distinct commitment to serve the community and its people with the most up to date facilities, convenient locations, and with the finest physicians. We provide care and guidance for patients with kidney disease including but are not limited to Chronic Kidney Disease. So contact us today, our team of specialized kidney doctors are ready to help you live a healthy and comfortable life from any of our clinics across Milwaukee, Waukesha and all of Southeast Wisconsin.

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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New to Dialysis – What you need to know

New to Dialysis - What you need to know

Starting dialysis can be scary and confusing, that’s why the experts at Midwest Nephrology are here to help clear up any questions or concerns. If you or a loved one is new to dialysis make sure to review our frequently asked questions about dialysis and contact us if you don’t see the answer you’re looking for or if you need more information. Our team of specialized kidney doctors are ready to help you live a healthy and comfortable life from any of our clinics across Milwaukee, Waukesha and all of Southeast Wisconsin.

WHAT IS DIALYSIS?

Dialysis is a way of cleaning your blood and is a common medical treatment for people with ESRD (End-Stage Renal Disease ), dialysis performs similarly to how healthy kidneys do.

WHAT DOES DIALYSIS DO?

Removes waste and extra water from your body. Regulates your body’s fluid balance. Helps to control your blood pressure.

WHAT IS CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE(CKD)?

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a term used to describe kidney damage or reduced kidney function. Chronic kidney disease may lead to kidney failure or end stage renal disease, which requires dialysis or a kidney transplant.

WHAT IS END STAGE RENAL DISEASE (ESRD)?

End stage renal disease is permanent kidney failure, causing your body to retain fluid and harmful waste builds up. Dialysis or a kidney transplant is needed to stay alive after being diagnosed with end stage renal disease.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF DIALYSIS TREATMENTS FOR END STAGE RENAL DISEASE?

There are 2 main types of dialysis: Hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD).

WHAT IS HEMODIALYSIS?

The word hemo means “blood” and dialysis means “filter”. Hemodialysis is a process where blood is filtered outside the body by a machine called a dialyzer or “artificial kidney,” and then returned to your body.

WHAT IS PERITONEAL DIALYSIS?

Peritoneal dialysis gets its name from the lining of your abdomen, which is called the peritoneum. This lining is a membrane that surrounds the space in your abdomen called the peritoneal cavity. This natural lining can be used to filter your blood.

HOW WILL I FEEL AFTER MY DIALYSIS TREATMENTS?

After treatment you may feel tired or weak but you should adjust to your dialysis treatments over time.

WHAT HAPPENS IF I DON’T FINISH MY WHOLE DIALYSIS TREATMENT?

Many dialysis treatments last about four hours and are done three times per week, shortening your treatment time may cause you to feel sick or result in hospitalization.

HOW MUCH FLUID SHOULD I DRINK AS A DIALYSIS PATIENT?

Depending on how much urine you can make, the nephrologist and renal dietitian at the dialysis unit will help determine the appropriate fluid levels for your individual needs.

CAN I TRAVEL WHILE ON DIALYSIS?

Yes, the social worker at the dialysis clinic can locate a dialysis center near your destination and help schedule your treatments.

CAN I WORK WHILE ON DIALYSIS?

Yes, our team at the dialysis clinic will work with you to accommodate your work schedule.

WHY DO I HAVE TO COME TO DIALYSIS 3 TIMES WEEKLY?

Between dialysis treatments toxins build up in the blood and these will eventually make you unwell. The more often you have treatment the easier it will be to control the toxins.

WHY DO I HAVE TO HAVE 4 HOURS OF TREATMENT EACH VISIT?

While working kidneys are filtering out waste continuously, dialysis tries to filter the same amount of waste in a shorter time frame.

WHY SHOULD I GO TO MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY?

We have a distinct commitment to serve the community and its people with the most up to date facilities, convenient locations, and with the finest physicians. We provide care and guidance for patients with kidney disease including but are not limited to Chronic Kidney Disease. So contact us today, our team of specialized kidney doctors are ready to help you live a healthy and comfortable life from any of our clinics across Milwaukee, Waukesha and all of Southeast Wisconsin.

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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Advancing American Kidney Health Initiative

Advancing American Kidney Health Initiative

Learn about the new initiative older adults with irreversible kidney disease are turning to. About 88% of the 726,000 people with end-stage kidney disease receive treatment in dialysis centers, but only 12% are currently getting home dialysis. Things are shifting in a new direction, by 2025 administration officials say 80% of patients newly diagnosed with end-stage kidney disease should be receiving home dialysis or a kidney transplants.

Why this is important

Half of the 125,000 people who learn they have kidney failure each year are 65 or older and home dialysis is the future. Potential benefits of home dialysis include:

  • Convenience: No more traveling to a dialysis center.
  • Shorter Recovery: Times after treatment are shorter.
  • Personalized therapy: Therapy can be delivered more often and more readily individualized.
  • Less strain: Putting less strain on a person’s body.
  • Better experience: Patients' quality of life tends to be much better.

Performing more home dialysis may seem like a no brainer, however there are still individuals who are unable to perform home dialysis. You should consult with your Nephrologist to determine if this modality is right for you.

At Midwest Nephrology we realize this can be a confusing and difficult decision to make on your own, we’re here to help. We have been serving the greater Southeastern Wisconsin area since 1989. We have a distinct commitment to serve the community and its people with the most up to date facilities, convenient locations, and with the finest physicians. We provide care and guidance for patients with kidney disease including but are not limited to Chronic Kidney Disease. So contact us today, our team of specialized kidney doctors are ready to help you live a healthy and comfortable life from any of our clinics across Milwaukee, Waukesha and all of Southeast Wisconsin.

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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Kidney Donor FAQs

Kidney Donor FAQs

Interested in becoming a kidney donor but have a few questions? We have the answers you’re looking for in regards to becoming a kidney donor, from how to find out if you're a match and the risk to recovery time and cost. Don’t see the answer you’re looking for? Feel free to reach out to us at Midwest Nephrology, we encourage you to contact us today to help make sure you’re getting the correct information and accurate Kidney Donor FAQs. Our experts have been serving the greater Southeastern Wisconsin area since 1989.

Frequently Asked Questions for Kidney Donors

WHO CAN BE A KIDNEY DONOR?

Anyone 18 years or older and that is in good physical and emotional health can apply to be a donor.

DOES MY BLOOD TYPE HAVE TO MATCH?

No, however, kidney donors must have a compatible blood type with the recipient.

WHAT HAS TO MATCH TO BE A KIDNEY DONOR?

There are three main blood tests that will determine if a patient and a potential donor are a kidney match, this includes:

  • Blood typing
  • Tissue typing
  • Cross-matching

WHAT IS BLOOD TYPING?

Blood typing is the first blood test that will determine if your blood is a compatible match with the potential donor's blood. This test measures blood antibodies that react with different blood groups.

WHAT IS TISSUE TYPING?

The first blood test is to determine the tissue (HLA) type of the patient and the potential donor to see how well they match.

WHAT IS A CROSS-MATCH?

A serum cross match is a blood test you and the donor will have multiple times, including right before the transplant surgery.

WHAT ARE THE ODDS OF BEING A KIDNEY MATCH?

Siblings have a 25% chance of being an "exact match" for a living donor and a 50% chance of being a half-match.

WHAT EXCLUDES YOU FROM DONATING A KIDNEY?

Medical conditions that could prevent you from being a donor include having high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, HIV, hepatitis, or acute infections. Additionally having a serious mental health condition may also prevent you from being a donor.

IS THERE A WEIGHT LIMIT FOR DONATING A KIDNEY?

Potential donors with BMI greater than 30 are warned of an increased risk of developing chronic co-morbid conditions if they donate a kidney, while those over 35 BMI are generally rejected from the donor pool.

WHO PAYS IF YOU DONATE A KIDNEY?

The recipient's Medicare or private health insurance generally will pay.

IS IT PAINFUL TO DONATE A KIDNEY?

After leaving the hospital, the donor will typically feel tenderness, itching and some pain as the incision continues to heal.

WHAT’S LIFE LIKE AFTER DONATING A KIDNEY?

After kidney donation, most people return to normal daily activities after two to four weeks.

CAN YOU DRINK ALCOHOL AFTER DONATING A KIDNEY?

There are no dietary restrictions following donation.

WHY SHOULD I GO TO MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY?

We have a distinct commitment to serve the community and its people with the most up to date facilities, convenient locations, and with the finest physicians. We provide care and guidance for patients with kidney disease including but are not limited to Chronic Kidney Disease. So contact us today, our team of specialized kidney doctors are ready to help you live a healthy and comfortable life from any of our clinics across Milwaukee, Waukesha and all of Southeast Wisconsin.

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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Research in Kidney Health and Disease

Research in Kidney Health and Disease

Get up to date on all the latest research, discoveries, and treatments for Kidney Disease. See how research in kidney health and disease has continued to push forward and all the great innovation coming soon. Currently, there are several promising new studies and breakthroughs that include:

  • A diabetes study that finds new treatment targets to help prevent chronic kidney disease.
  • A gene therapy method developed to target damaged kidney cells.
  • New drug development to help lower glucose levels and protect against kidney failure.

TARGETED TREATMENT

A diabetes study has found a new treatment to target and prevent chronic kidney disease. From a leading team of diabetes researchers, a discovery found an innovative way to target problematic protein, helping not just prevent kidney damage but also significantly slowing the diseases’ progression. The findings from the University of Lincoln led by Dr. Claire Hills from Lincoln's School of Life Sciences, the research explores a key cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

"Recent studies have linked certain forms of kidney disease to proteins called connexins, which normally help to facilitate communication between kidney cells. If these connexins fail, signaling molecules spill into the organ and set off a chain of events that can ultimately lead to kidney failure. One connexin—called Cx43—actually makes the whole situation worse, so our new research set out to effectively block Cx43," said Dr. Hill. "By providing insight into the initiating trigger for early injury in chronic kidney disease, we expose the tantalizing prospect that by altering the tone of conversation between cells we could prevent kidney damage and slow disease progression." Source

GENE THERAPY

From Washington University in St. Louis, a new gene therapy method has been making headlines due to its ability to target damaged kidney cells. This research has proven in mice, that genetic material can be delivered to damaged cells in the kidneys. Why is that important? This new research will greatly help in the development of new gene therapy treatments, which in turn can be used to treat chronic kidney disease. Source

NEW DRUG DEVELOPMENT

Published in the New England Journal of Medicine by the University of Oxford. A new drug called “Canagliflozin” was recently developed to help lower glucose levels for people with diabetes. Recent studies have shown the drug to not only protect against kidney failure but also reduce heart failure by over 30% and major cardiovascular events by around 20%. For more information, you can check out the source link and contact us at Midwest Nephrology for more information. Source

CONTACT US TODAY TO LEARN MORE

At Midwest Nephrology we know there is a variety of different information floating around about new kidney disease research and treatment breakthroughs, that’s why we encourage you to contact us today to help make sure you’re getting the correct information and accurate treatment expectations. You depend on our experts who have been serving the greater Southeastern Wisconsin area since 1989. We have a distinct commitment to serve the community and its people with the most up to date facilities, convenient locations, and with the finest physicians. We provide care and guidance for patients with kidney disease including but are not limited to Chronic Kidney Disease. So contact us today, our team of specialized kidney doctors are ready to help you live a healthy and comfortable life from any of our clinics across Milwaukee, Waukesha and all of Southeast Wisconsin.

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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Home Hemodialysis During COVID-19

Home Hemodialysis During COVID-19

Is Home Hemodialysis Right for you?

Living with Kidney Disease can be a daily challenge and even more so during a global pandemic. You may be asking the question if at home hemodialysis is right for you at this time? Midwest Nephrology has reviewed some of the pros and cons for you to discuss with your healthcare provider to see if this option is the correct one for you.

Home hemodialysis takes effort and may not be for everyone. The following are crucial steps when practicing home hemodialysis:

  • Maintenance of the dialysis machine is required
  • Setup machine for each treatment
  • Complete each treatment as specified by doctor
  • Sanitize the equipment properly after each treatment
  • Keep necessary supplies stocked and ordered

You essentially become a nurse, dialysis tech, and patient within one or two people. Providers will likely recommend you have a care partner to assist you during this process.

Pros and cons of home hemodialysis

Pros may include convenience, flexibility with treatment, and not having to go out in public with potential exposure to Coronavirus.

Pros:

  • Easier to fit into your daily schedule
  • Easier to keep working if you have a job or you wish to return to work or school
  • Not having to travel to a dialysis center three times a week
  • Independence and being in control of your own treatments
  • Likelihood of a better health outcome over time
  • The comfort and privacy of being in your own home during treatment
  • Having access to telephone, family members, and visitors during treatment
  • Being able to eat and drink if you choose to during treatment

Cons:

  • Initial fears about duties and caring for the dialysis machine
  • Training for home hemodialysis is not offered by all dialysis centers
  • More space is needed in your home for equipment and supplies
  • A care partner is generally needed to be with you during treatments
  • Training may take three to eight weeks or longer, with three- to five-hour training sessions per week
  • Some new machines are portable, but you will have to find a dialysis center for support when traveling
  • Less social interaction compared with going to the dialysis center
  • Your care partner may tire of this role

Types of At Home Hemodialysis

Conventional home hemodialysis
Conventional home hemodialysis is a treatment you do yourself at home, with the help of a partner. Both you and your partner must be trained to use the machine and to insert the needles into your vascular access. A home hemodialysis machine is a small version of the in-center hemodialysis machine that does the same job. This type of dialysis may let you have a more flexible treatment schedule because you can do your treatments when it is convenient for you.

However, you must follow your doctor’s instructions about how many times per week you need to do your treatments and how long each treatment should last. Most people who choose conventional home hemodialysis do their treatments three times per week for three to five hours each time. It is very important that you do not skip your treatments!

Nocturnal home hemodialysis
If you work, go to school or have other commitments during the day, you may choose to do nocturnal home hemodialysis. This treatment schedule allows you and your care partner to do your treatments at home, while you sleep. Each treatment session lasts six to eight hours and can be done every other night or more often, depending on what your doctor thinks is best for you.

Having your treatments more often and for longer periods of time means that fluid is taken out of your blood more slowly and more often. This may help you feel better between treatments and may allow you more freedom with your diet and fluid intake.

Short daily home hemodialysis
Short daily home hemodialysis is done for about two hours, every day of the week or almost every day. Your doctor can tell you how often you should do your treatments. This type of hemodialysis can be done at any time of the day that is convenient for you and your care partner. Having your treatments more often means that fluid is taken out of your blood more slowly and more often. This may help you feel better between treatments.

Explore what is right for you!

Research your options, talk with other kidney disease patients, talk with your doctor and your family to decide if at home hemodialysis is right for you. Midwest Nephrology is available to discuss this option with you and provide you with the resources you need.

Resources:

https://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-today/dialyzing-at-home-during-the-pandemic.html

https://www.kidney.org/sites/default/files/11-10-0329_homehemo.pdf

https://www.kcercoalition.com/covid-19

https://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-disease/kidney-failure/treatment-of-kidney-failure/hemodialysis/

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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COVID-19 & Kidney Disease: Frequently Asked Questions

COVID-19 & Kidney Disease: Frequently Asked Questions

As COVID-19 continues to progress, Midwest Nephrology realizes this time can be confusing and difficult, especially while managing kidney disease. We have compiled a list of questions and answers we hope you find helpful during this unprecedented time. If you are unsure of your health or any of these suggestions please contact your local healthcare provider.

FAQs: Coronavirus and Kidney Disease

AS AREAS START TO OPEN UP, WHAT PRECAUTIONS SHOULD I CONTINUE TO TAKE?

It is important to remain aware of the virus and stay informed regarding changes especially if you are in the high-risk category. The CDC provides guidelines for how to protect yourself and others during this time. Stay in touch with your healthcare provider and seek assistance when needed.

ARE RESOURCES AVAILABLE REGARDING COVD-19 SPECIFICALLY FOR PEOPLE WITH KIDNEY DISEASE?

Yes! The listed organizations, along with countless others, are working hard to provide updates and resources on COVID-19. Be sure to check each organization’s website regularly as new information and resources become available.

  • American Kidney Fund (AKF): www.kidneyfund.org/coronavirus Kidney Community
  • Emergency Response (KCER) Coalition: www.kcercoalition.com/covid-19
  • DaVita: www.davita.com/covid-19-information
  • American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP): www.aakp.org

AM I AT A HIGHER RISK FOR CATCHING COVID-19 IF I HAVE KIDNEY DISEASE?

Everyone is at risk of getting COVID-19. Based on what we know now, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 are:

  • People 65 years and older
  • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
  • People of all ages with underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled
  • People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
  • People who have serious heart conditions
  • People who are immunocompromised Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, smoking, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications
  • People with severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] of 40 or higher)
  • People with diabetes
  • People with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis
  • People with liver disease

If you have a kidney transplant and are taking immunosuppressant medicine, you may also be at a higher risk. Take the recommended CDC steps to reduce your risk of catching COVID-19.

HOW CAN I PROTECT MYSELF FROM COVID-19?

The CDC recommends everyone take the following steps to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands often with soap for at least 20 seconds
  • Do not touch your face, nose, and eyes
  • Stay home and avoid crowds
  • Keep distance between yourself and other people, at least 6 feet clean and disinfect things that your or others touch often (door knobs, toilet, steering wheel, phone case)

Visit CDC’s website for more steps to prevent getting sick and to learn how to protect yourself.

ARE DIALYSIS CLINICS OPEN AND SHOULD I BE GOING TO TREATMENTS?

YES! Dialysis clinics are still open and operating and you should NOT miss a treatment. Your immune system is stronger when your blood is clean. Dialysis clinics are already taking extra steps for your safety. If there are changes in your clinic’s hours or to your dialysis schedule, your dialysis team from your clinic will contact you. If you are not sure about schedules, procedures, or simply have questions, call your clinic

HOW CAN I GET EMERGENCY DIALYSIS?

Call your dialysis center. They will either find a way to fit you into their schedule or refer you to another nearby dialysis center.

WHAT DO I DO IF MY TRANSPLANT IS RESCHEDULED OR POSTPONED?

If your transplant is rescheduled or postponed, the most important thing to do now is to continue your dialysis treatments and avoid contact with anyone infected with the coronavirus or with anyone who has had contact with people in public spaces.

CAN I GET A KIDNEY FROM SOMEONE WHO HAS HAD CORONAVIRUS?

If the living donor you are considering has coronavirus, talk to your transplant team. The transplant team will decide whether your living donor is still a good candidate for organ donation after they are no longer sick.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I FEEL SICK?

If you are feeling sick, tell your healthcare team immediately. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus.

People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fever Chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

This list is not all possible symptoms. Other less common symptoms have been reported, including gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

WHAT CAN I DO IF COVID-19 IS GIVING ME ANXIETY AND THIS SUDDEN CHANGE IN DAILY ROUTINE IS CAUSING DEPRESSION?

If you are on dialysis and have a social worker, talk to your social worker! They are trained to help you navigate your emotions. If you do not have a social worker, call your insurance provider to see if mental health counseling is covered in your benefits and if telehealth is an option for you.

Some additional tips to reduce anxiety and depression include:

  • Mindful thinking: “Attention to thoughts and feelings without judging whether they are right or wrong; paying attention to the present state, not the past.”
  • Meditation Breathing exercises
  • Physical exercise
  • Limit or cut caffeine out of your diet
  • Practice best sleep hygiene
  • Journaling

To learn more about taking care of your mental wellbeing, watch the following webinars:

Anxiety and kidney disease

Depression: the overlooked complication of kidney disease

RESOURCE:

American Kidney Fund: Coronavirus (COVID-19) FAQs for kidney patients

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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TAKING CARE OF YOUR KIDNEYS

Taking Care of Your Kidneys

Taking Care of Your Kidneys

*Disclaimer: This blog post is designed to be an informative resource regarding the topic of kidney health with resource information for kidney education. Each person and patient are different, please talk with your doctor regarding the right treatment plan for you and any kidney health questions you might have.

TAKING CARE OF YOUR KIDNEYS

Health and Wellness Program: Heart Your Kidneys - National Kidney Foundation Wisconsin

The National Kidney Foundation of Wisconsin is committed to improving the overall health of Wisconsin families. As part of this commitment, the National Kidney Foundation of Wisconsin not only educates and supports awareness and prevention of chronic kidney disease and all organ transplantation but also of diabetes and high blood pressure. Diabetes and high blood pressure are major contributors to the development of chronic kidney disease. In order to increase awareness and prevention, the National Kidney Foundation of Wisconsin provides programs and resources on health and wellness in three venues.

  • Guest speaker programs on a variety of related topics offered simultaneously as a live-streamed online webinar and as a face to face live program.
  • Development of company-specific wellness presentations and resource materials for corporate wellness planning.
  • Informational exhibits on a wide range of topics that can be developed for health fairs, company conferences or an organization’s meeting.

EDUCATE YOURSELF: HOW TO KEEP YOUR KIDNEYS HEALTHY

The Kidneys job is to filter waste products, excess water, and other impurities from your blood, along with regulating pH, salt, and potassium levels in your body. They also produce hormones that regulate blood pressure and control the production of red blood cells.

The National Kidney Foundation’s most direct way of fighting kidney disease is its KEEP HEALTHY program. The program involves organizing screenings in local communities throughout Wisconsin that provide various simple tests to help with spotting early kidney problems. The screenings also offer opportunities to discuss the risk factors of kidney disease and to talk to various medical professionals about questions attendees might have related to the kidneys.

Upcoming Screening Saturday, May 16, 2020 in Waukesha, registration will open in April, 2020.

THINGS YOU CAN DO TO KEEP YOUR KIDNEY HEALTHY INCLUDE:

Regular exercise and a healthy diet, together these can lower the risk of chronic kidney disease. In tandem, they can help reduce your blood pressure and help start healthy habits.

Control your blood sugar and monitor your blood pressure, kidneys are forced to work extra hard to filter your blood when your blood sugars and pressure are high and controlling your levels can reduce the risk of damaging your kidneys. If your blood pressure readings are consistently above 140/90, you may have high blood pressure. You should talk with your doctor about monitoring about making changes to your lifestyle, and possibly taking medication.

Drink plenty of fluids, water helps clear sodium and toxins from your kidneys and lowers your risk of chronic kidney disease.

Stop bad habits, smoking, unhealthy levels of alcohol, poor diets, and other lifestyle choices that can lead to future kidney problems. Stopping these habits can help reduce blood pressure, reduce the risk for cancer, and help your body operate at an optimal level for long term benefits.

Lastly, talk to your doctor, it’s important to know your body and your family’s history of kidney disease. Doing so can help you and your doctor create the best possible plan to keep your kidney healthy and reduce the risk of potential kidney disease.

Things to go over with your doctor include:

  • Over-the-counter that may be causing your kidney harm.
  • Getting tested if you’re at high risk and going over family history.
  • Potential lifestyle changes needed to maintain long term health benefits.

At Midwest Nephrology Associates we have been serving the greater Southeastern Wisconsin area since 1989. We have a distinct commitment to serve the community and its people with the most up to date facilities convenient locations and with the finest physicians. We provide care and guidance for patients with kidney disease including but are not limited to Chronic Kidney Disease. So contact us today, our team of specialized kidney doctors are ready to help you live a healthy and comfortable life from any of our clinics across Milwaukee, Waukesha and all of Southeast Wisconsin.

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease & How to Prevent It

Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease & How to Prevent It

Doctors measure how well your kidneys filter waste from your blood by estimating your glomerular filtration rate, or eGFR. Your eGFR is a number based on your blood test for creatinine, a waste product in your blood. The stages of kidney disease are determined by how well the kidneys function to filter waste and extra fluid out of your blood. After determining your filtration rate, chronic kidney disease is indicated by 5 stages of kidney damage.

*NOTE: This blog is designed to be an informative resource regarding the topic of Chronic Kidney Disease Stages with tips on how to prevent kidney disease from developing. Each person and patient are different, please talk with your doctor regarding the right treatment plan for you and any kidney health questions you might have.

STAGES OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

Stage 1, an eGFR of 90 or greater means. This filtration rate means your kidneys are healthy and working well but have signs of mild kidney damage including protein in your urine or physical damage to your kidneys.

Stage 2, an eGFR between 60 and 89. Your kidneys are healthy and working well but have you have other signs of kidney damage including your urine or physical damage to your kidneys.

The first two stages can be slowed down by taking control of your blood sugar, blood pressure, eating healthy, working out, and stopping smoking.

Stage 3, an eGFR between 30 and 59. These levels indicate your kidneys aren’t working as well as they should and have some damage. Stage 3 is separated into two stages; Stage 3a, an eGFR between 45 and 59 and Stage 3b, an eGFR between 30 and 44. Stage 3 warning signs may include hands and feet swelling, back pain, and less urinating. Stage 3 complications include high blood pressure, anemia, and bone disease.

Slowing down Stage 3 includes all the same healthy lifestyle choices as the first two stages as well as a visit to a specialist kidney doctor called a nephrologist to help set up a treatment plan.

Stage 4, an eGFR between 15 and 29. In the last stage before kidney failure, your kidneys are moderately or severely damaged and are not working as they should. Stage 4 kidney disease symptoms include hands and feet swelling, back pain, and urinating more or less. Complications for Stage 4 include high blood pressure, anemia, and bone disease.

At this point, you’ll need to have regular appointments with a nephrologist who will make a treatment plan that is right for you, get help from a dietitian, and possibly take special blood pressure medicines. This is the last stage to prepare for Stage 5, kidney failure.

Stage 5, an eGFR less than 15. At this point, you’re close to failure or have complete kidney failure. When this happens, waste builds up in your blood and will make you sick. Some symptoms of kidney failure include all the signs of the previous stages including itching, muscle cramps, throwing up, no appetite, trouble breathing and sleeping.

If your kidney’s fail, you’ll need to begin dialysis to help clean your blood and prepare for a kidney transplant from a healthy donor or else you’ll need dialysis for the rest of your life.

HOW TO PREVENT

Chronic Kidney Disease is commonly brought on by diabetes and high blood pressure. Working with your doctor and possibly a dietitian can help keep your blood sugar and blood pressure under control. Make sure to keep up with regular annual doctor check-ups to stay on top of any early warning signs.

Along with some professionals help, choosing a healthy lifestyle can lower your risk for kidney disease; starting with a low-salt, low-fat diet, exercising at least 30 minutes daily, not smoking, and limiting alcohol consumption, all are great ways to help yourself!

At Midwest Nephrology Associates, we provide care and guidance for patients with kidney disease. Our doctors will determine the best dialysis treatment plan for you and we have three transplant nephrologists with training and expertise in the field of kidney transplantation. Contact us at any of our clinics across Milwaukee, Waukesha and all of Southeast Wisconsin with any questions or concerns.

CONTACT MIDWEST NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES TODAY

Have any questions or concerns? Our dedicated team of physicians and certified staff are here to help answer all your questions and can help set up an appointment for you or a loved one. Contact Midwest Nephrology Associates for more information on Kidney Cancer and for help finding a treatment that works best for you.

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